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Sausage mushroom and cheese crumble

Sausage mushroom and cheese crumble
A small ramekin filled with sausage sandwiched between two layers of cooked mushrooms, topped with a savoury crumble made with cancoillotte (a cheese typical of eastern France). All the French region of Franche-comté is in this recipe: Morteau sausage, cancoillotte cheese, and Jura white wine.
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For 6 people, you will need:



Nutritional information:

Whole recipe
Calories
1976
99%
Proteins
32g
12%
Carbohydrates
82g
8%
Fats
169g
26%
 Per 100 g 
Calories
240
12%
Proteins
4g
1%
Carbohydrates
10g
1%
Fats
20g
3%
 Per person 
Calories
329
16%
Proteins
5g
2%
Carbohydrates
13g
1%
Fats
28g
4%
TrafficRating
  • Already noted 2 times
  • Average note : 1.5/3






% are calculated relative to a Recommended Dietary Intake or RDI of 2000 k-calories by day for a woman (change to a man).


Times:

Preparation : 1 hour 3 min.
Resting : 1 hour 30 min.
Cooking : 1 hour 17 min.
Start to finish : 3 hours 50 min.
Preservation : Several days in the fridge, covered by a plastic film.


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How much will it cost?

 For 6 people : 16.05 €
 Per person  : 2.68 €

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 Note : These prices are only approximate. Read more...



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Next message on 2014-09-28

Step by step recipe:


1
Cut 6 slices Morteau sausage (cooked and cold) into small sticks then small dice. Set aside.
Sausage mushroom and cheese crumble : Photo of step #1
2
When you use dry morels, a part of their delicate taste disappears with the first water. Here is a way to limit this loss: morel juice.

Put 30 g dried morels in a bowl, add enough hot water just to cover, cover with a lid or plate.

Leave 15 minutes, then remove morels from water (keep this juice), and put them in another bowl of warm water.

Sausage mushroom and cheese crumble : Photo of step #2
3
Allow the morels to release all their mud and grit by agitating them and changing the water frequently(2 or 3 times minimum, every 30 minutes).

Note: at each change take morels out of the water carefully (with your hands or a skimmer) and put them in another container, to be sure that and mud and grit stays in the bottom of the first bowl.

When morels are completely clean, remove stalks and cut large ones into two or four.

Sausage mushroom and cheese crumble : Photo of step #3
4
Strain morel juice with a coffee filter to remove all remaining sand.
Sausage mushroom and cheese crumble : Photo of step #4
5
Break off stalks from 130 g button or field mushrooms and discard.
Sausage mushroom and cheese crumble : Photo of step #5
6
Peel the caps.
Sausage mushroom and cheese crumble : Photo of step #6
7
Cut caps in half, then each half into small pieces. Sprinkle with juice of ½ lemon.
Sausage mushroom and cheese crumble : Photo of step #7
8
Put 1 tablespoon goose fat in a pan on medium heat. When hot, add 1 shallot chopped, and cook 1 or 2 minutes.
Sausage mushroom and cheese crumble : Photo of step #8
9
Add the small pieces of mushroom, and cook until there is no liquid left.
Sausage mushroom and cheese crumble : Photo of step #9
10
Add morels and their juice, and cook until there is no liquid left.
Sausage mushroom and cheese crumble : Photo of step #10
11
Add ½ glass dry white wine (if possible from Jura, Savagnin variety), and cook until just a little liquid remains.

Preheat oven to 410°F (210°C).

Sausage mushroom and cheese crumble : Photo of step #11
12
Add 300 ml liquid cream, salt and pepper, and allow to thicken slowly.

Check seasoniing: it should still need a little more salt (but the smoked sausage is coming...). Set aside.

Sausage mushroom and cheese crumble : Photo of step #12
13
Using a blender, mix 70 g flour + 70 g cancoillotte metton, to obtain a coarse powder.
Sausage mushroom and cheese crumble : Photo of step #13
14
To this powder add cold 70 g butter, cut into small pieces, and rub in with finger-tips to get a sandy texture.
Sausage mushroom and cheese crumble : Photo of step #14
15
Fill ramekins with a layer of mushrooms, then a layer of diced sausage.
Sausage mushroom and cheese crumble : Photo of step #15
16
Cover with another layer of mushrooms, and finally a layer of crumble, and press down lightly to give an even crust.

Put in the oven, until top is golden brown.

Sausage mushroom and cheese crumble : Photo of step #16

Remarks:

If you don't have metton, you can use instead grated cheese of your choice.

And to drink?

If possible the same dry white wine you use for cooking the mushrooms.

Source:

Home made

Last modified on: February 21th 2011

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Next message on 2014-09-28

Your 2 comments or questions on this recipe:

- - -

Hallo, what is cancoillotte metton? I have never heard of this? Thank you.Lori lori@quest13.co.nz

Comment #1 posted on august 1st 2009 at 02:31 by Lori.

Hi Lori : Cancoillotte metton is a strange cow cheese from the east of France (my birth area). It look like a rough powder when not prepared, so it's called "metton", and when prepared (on slow heat with milk) it become Cancoillotte, and it's a very very smooth and tasty cheese, which is almost liquid, even cold, it look like (a bit) to peanut butter thicken.

Some short informations in English about it in wikipedia.

I suppose it's very difficult to find in New-Zealand... So instead, please use grated Parmesan (Parmigiano reggiano).

Comment #2 posted on august 2nd 2009 at 13:11 by jh.


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