The blog of cooking-ez.com

How to choose a centrifugal juicer


How to choose a centrifugal juicer
A centrifugal juicer is an appliance designed to extract juice from all kinds of fruit and vegetables. It will produce juice from tomatoes, carrots, apples, pineapple, blackcurrants, etc.
40K 4.4/5 based on 22 reviews
Grade this page:

Last modified on: April 1st 2011

Keywords for this post:CentrifugeJuiceExtractionChoiceUtensilEquipment
How to choose a centrifugal juicer

centrifugeuseThe principle is very simple: the chosen fruit is fed into the top of the machine through a pipe called a "chimney".


centrifugeuseThe fruit is washed, but not peeled as this is not necessary. They are pulverized by a grater which rotates at very high speed (green arrow), the pulp obtained is thrown against a very fine grid where the juice is extracted by centrifugal force (hence the name), the "dry" pulp is ejected at the rear into a collection tray (blue arrow), and the precious juice is collected in a pitcher (red arrow).


centrifugeuseNote that the resulting juice is very, very frothy, and you'll need to wait a few minutes for it to settle before the froth rises to the top and the (clear) juice settles to the bottom.

Selection criteria

There are all sorts of centrifuge models and brands to choose from, and having hesitated a great deal before taking the plunge, I'd like to give you the points I consider important, or not, in making your choice.

What's important

  • Power and speed: these determine the machine's capacity and efficiency. To be efficient, it needs to turn very fast (8,000 rpm minimum), and be powerful (500 watts minimum) to avoid jamming during operation.
  • The recovery pitcher: This essential element receives the juice that flows from the centrifuge, and is designed so that when you pour, the foam remains in the pitcher and only the juice flows out.
  • The pulp tank or pulp selector: A tank at the back of the centrifuge that receives the pulp from whatever you're juicing, it allows you to juice large quantities of fruit before having to clean the machine.
  • The size of the chimney: The larger the chimney, the better, as it allows you to process whole fruits (apples, for example) without cutting them.

Not essential

  • Centrifuge parts are dishwasher-safe, but cleaning by hand is easier and more effective.
  • The centrifuge's spout can be raised to avoid dripping onto the work surface, which is just handy.
  • Several rotation speeds, although we always use the maximum speed.
  • Citrus juicer function, but of little interest.

To sum up

  1. 500 Watts, 800 rpm minimum
  2. Recovery pitcher
  3. Pulp bin

My choice

Based on these criteria, I opted for a Philips HR 1858, which I bought for around €150 in 2010. I'm very happy with it, although it broke down after 1 month and was sent to the after-sales service for 3 weeks...

centrifugeuseBut since then, it's been a real pleasure to use: Grany apple juice, for example, made in 1 minute, is simply divine!




Lasts posts
Clean your mixer easily
Clean your mixer easily
If you use a "bowl" or "blender" mixer, as opposed to a plunger, you've probably noticed that it's a bit of a hassle to clean it after use. And yet, with a simple trick, it can be done very quickly. See how here.
1,6505 June 26th 2024
Preserving egg yolks
Preserving egg yolks
If you're using only the egg whites in a recipe (such as meringues ), you'll need to store the yolks until you're ready to use them again. There's nothing very complicated about this in principle - all you have to do is chill them, but there are a few pitfalls to be avoided in practice.
2,1855 June 18th 2024
Preservative oil, an asset for taste
Preservative oil, an asset for taste
When you prepare a dish using an ingredient that has been preserved in fat, for example a springtime mixed salad with tuna in oil or sun-dried tomatoes, you're probably going to make a french dressing (vinaigrette) next. In that case, why not use the preserved oil from the tuna or tomatoes?
2,3185 June 5th 2024
Don't throw away disposable piping bags
Don't throw away disposable piping bags
Nowadays, it's fairly easy to find what professionals use as piping bags, i.e. disposable or "single-use" plastic ones. They're practical, functional and inexpensive, but disposable? That's debatable...
3,7105 May 28th 2024
Should asparagus really be cooked in bunches?
Should asparagus really be cooked in bunches?
You'll probably read recipes here and there explaining how to cook asparagus "en botte", i.e. in a small package (the famous "botte"). Is this really the right way to cook asparagus?
2,8575 May 22th 2024
Other pages you may also like
The secret of cooking until "done"
The secret of cooking until "done"
This is a real chef's skill: being able to look at a fish fillet cooking and say, "Stop – that's enough, it's cooked". I always admire this ability to see at a glance if something is done. It is what sets the professionals apart from us mere amateurs. And it's true that how fish is cooked is...
16K4.4 November 26th 2012
The march forward
The march forward
When professionals get to work in their kitchen, lab or bakery, they are (if they are conscientious) very sensitive to hygiene and cleanliness. It is impossible for a good baker for example to do a day's work without regularly cleaning the table where he or she works, and it is even more...
14K5 June 30th 2021
In praise of slow cooking
In praise of slow cooking
You will no doubt have noticed that in cookery, it's often the actual cooking process that gets neglected. This is understandable; it comes at the end of the recipe and getting the dish in the oven is something of a relief (ah, that's done!), which frees us to cope with what's left: tidying the...
37K4.2 February 9th 2011
How to zest a fruit?
How to zest a fruit?
You will have no doubt noticed that many recipes call for the zest of citrus fruit. The zest is that outer layer of the skin which adds so much flavour to a dish. There are many different ways to peel off the zest and various tools are available. Here is a summary of the “dos and don'ts” of...
41K3.8 November 5th 2013
Steam for baking bread
Steam for baking bread
What does steam have to do with bread-making? This is not only a bakers' secret, it is something you might not think of at all: if you make bread and bake it like a cake, you will end up with bread, but pale and with a thick, hard crust – a long way from the golden-brown crusty loaf you had in...
137K4.5 June 16th 2021
Post a comment or question
Posted by:
I am not a leaving thing
Follow this page
If you are interested in this page, you can "follow" it, by entering your email address here. You will then receive a notification immediately each time the page is modified or a new comment is added. Please note that you will need to confirm this following.
I am not a leaving thing
Note: We'll never share your e-mail address with anyone else.
Alternatively: you can subscribe to the mailing list of cooling-ez.com , you will receive a e-mail for each new recipe published on the site.

Back to top of page