The blog of cooking-ez.com

The baker always gild twice

Keywords for this post:BakeryPastryGildingGlazeEgg
The baker always gild twice
I've already told you about gilding, the beaten whole egg that is spread with a brush on anything that needs to brown in the oven: puff pastry, pastries, etc. and that professionals use a lot, I'm going to come back to this to clarify a bit how to do it, and give you a professional tip.
8,219 11 3.9
Grade this page:

Last modified on: June 9th 2019

The baker always gild twice

"Gilding" therefore means coating the surface of something that is going to be baked withbeaten egg, the thin layer of gilding applied will colour when baked and give a very appetising appearance to your puff pastry or your pastry.

dorer



Some people, and I am one of them, think that it also influences the taste, a cake or a pastry all pale or whitish, even if it is successful "inside", will seem much less good than if it is all beautiful, all golden. What do you want, it's like this: all the senses are involved when we taste something.

brioche dorée



It's very simple in the end, this gilding is just a brush stroke, but there is a way to do it that makes it even better. Let's imagine that you start making a brioche: you knead your dough, you put it to puff up in a warm place, then a stroke of gilding and in the oven.

This is already very good, but you can still do better, here is how:

  1. Once finished, you put your brioche dough in its mould
  2. Bake the dough once, and let it rise in the warmth (we say "push")
  3. Once the brioche is well pushed, you gild a second time
  4. Only then do you put it in the oven

This way of doing things, browning twice, has only advantages: Your dough will be protected from crusting during the baking process, so there's no need to cover it, and the golden colour of the brioche when baked will be even more marked.

Be careful, if it is a puff pastry that you are making, and you have planned drawings(inlays) on the top, they should only be done after the second browning.

To sum up: when you gild something, always do it twice.

Back to top of page

Lasts posts

Other pages you may also like

A few tips for effective kneading at home
A few tips for effective kneading at home
Let's start with an observation: these mini-kneaders can handle all sorts of baking and preparation, and are no less effective, when it comes to making bread or viennoiseries, for working a dough using the dough hook. In practice, if we simply tip all the ingredients into the bowl and start the...
183K 23.7
Chive flowers
Chive flowers
If you have a chive plant in your garden or on your balcony (which is a very good idea, by the way) you should be seeing beautiful purple flowers like this one as I write this:The stem of these flowers is very hard, but the flower itself consists of small heads that can be easily detached...
17K4.5
The right weight of pastry for a pie
The right weight of pastry for a pie
This is not at all obvious actually, as ideally once the mould is lined it should only stick out about 1cm.You can of course use your own judgement, but at home I often use a 22 cm diameter (the small one), or sometimes 26 (the large one), and in any case I always get a 300 gr cake. And of...
17K3.7
85 grams of eggs?
85 grams of eggs?
In pastry making, it's another matter, if you need 250 gr of flour to make a shortbread dough for example, you'd better put 250 gr and not 270 or 230, because at best the dough will become a bit too soft or a bit too hard. This is what makes the rigor that is imposed on pastry cooks, and that...
23K4.5
Raising (or leavening) agents
Raising (or leavening) agents
Baker's YeastThis is the yeast used by bakers to make bread, brioches, etc. It is basically the same kind that brewers use to make beer, so it is sometimes also known as brewer's yeast.Yeast is a living organism, a microscopic fungus, called saccaromycès cerevisae, which reacts with the sugars...
42K4.5

Post your comment or question

I am not a leaving thing

Follow this page

If you are interested in this page, you can "follow" it, by entering your email address here. You will then receive a notification immediately each time the page is modified or a new comment is added. Please note that you will need to confirm this following.
I am not a leaving thing
Note: We'll never share your email with anyone else.
Alternatively: you can subscribe to the mailing list of cooling-ez.com , you will receive a e-mail for each new recipe published on the site.

Back to top of page