The blog of cooking-ez.com

The right bread knife


The right bread knife
We almost all have a bread knife in our kitchen, that is to say the knife we use almost exclusively to cut bread.
Is this knife efficient, is it really the one you need? Here is some information to guide you in your choice.
7,221
Grade this page:

Last modified on: September 15th 2022

Keywords for this post:KnifeBreadSizeBladeCuttingSaw
The right bread knife

découpe de pain

First of all a statement: It is not easy to cut bread with an ordinary kitchen knife, the blade is too small, it does not allow to cut a bread beyond a baguette, and its small handle does not ensure a good grip.
You really need a specific knife for that, and which has, if possible, the following characteristics.

couteau à génoise


1) A serrated blade
That is to say with teeth, we often say "saw knife", as opposed to a smooth blade, which allows an easier cutting of the bread.
You will sometimes read, here or there, that you should not "tear the bread crumb" with a serrated blade, but this is nonsense.

2) A long blade
This is the main defect of bad bread knives, their blade, although serrated, is not long enough to allow a good cutting. With a long blade, your gesture will be more ample, therefore easier, and the cut more regular.

3) A wide handle
It is absolutely necessary that you have a good grip on your knife, so that its handle is comfortable and well adapted to the size of your hand.

4) Practical materials
It is not an obligation, but your bread knife must be easy to use and maintain, which in my opinion implies both a stainless steel blade and an abs plastic handle or equivalent that does not fear water.

With all these criteria, it is quite simple to find the ideal knife, the choice is quite vast fortunately.

To make a long story short, the main defect you will encounter is a blade that is too short. I advise you to opt for a blade of 10 inches (25 cm) minimum.
You will easily find a lot of bread knives with a 8 inches (20 cm) blade, which certainly cut, but are much less efficient than a 25 cm blade.

taille des lames des couteaux à pains



The trick I suggest is to look for, or go to a professional store, and choose what they call a "sponge knife", which is a saw knife with all the criteria we just mentioned and a 11 inches (28 cm) blade.
You will be delighted with its efficiency, to easily cut from the smallest to the largest loaf, and to make even slices.
The next time you go to your bakery, look at the knife that the sales team uses to cut the bread for the customers, it is exactly this model.

To sum up: For your bread knife, you need a stainless, long (10 inches (25 cm) minimum) and serrated blade.



Back to top of page

Lasts posts
Half milk, half cream
Half milk, half cream
In a multitude of recipes, savoury or sweet, milk is used as the main ingredient, or at least as the main liquid ingredient. Milk is used instead of water, for example, because milk contains a proportion of fat, which adds roundness and softness to the recipe. This mellowness is very pleasant on...
560 February 27th 2024
Cutting soft cheeses
Cutting soft cheeses
As you may have already noticed, when you have to use a "soft" cheese in a recipe - their exact name is "soft cheese" - such as Camembert, Munster or Mont d'or, it's not easy to make anything other than thick slices.
7575 February 20th 2024
It's spinning too fast!
It's spinning too fast!
When you need to grate or slice vegetables, you generally use an electric machine that does all the work: a food processor, a mixer with a "slicer" extension or similar. Are these machines really suitable? Generally speaking, yes of course, but there's one criterion that often poses a problem,...
3,8835 November 12th 2023
When I was a kid, I didn't like...
When I was a kid, I didn't like...
Maybe you've already made this strange observation: when you were a kid, there were things you hated, but as an adult it's almost the opposite? For example, you used to hate spinach or chicory, but now you love it?
3,5355 November 5th 2023
How easy is it to chop herbs?
How easy is it to chop herbs?
Whenever you have fresh herbs - parsley, chervil, coriander, mint, etc. - to incorporate into a recipe, we tell you to chop them up. In this case, "chopping" means separating the leaves from the stems, keeping only the leaves, and chopping them more or less finely. It's not very complicated,...
5,4965 September 12th 2023
Other pages you may also like
Stand mixer tools
Stand mixer tools
Whether we call it a stand mixer, food processor, or simply refer to it by brand (Kenwood, KitchenAid, etc.), this machine is a valuable tool for amateur cooks, bakers or pastry chefs like ourselves. All these machines come supplied with 3 different tools. Let’s take a look at their names and...
31K4.5 November 2nd 2019
The skin side of the fish first?
The skin side of the fish first?
When it comes to cooking fresh fish, if it's filleted with its skin on and you're planning to pan-fry it in a little olive oil, for example, you might ask yourself the following question: Which side, skin or flesh, should come into contact with the pan first?
17K4.4 February 13th 2021
Cutting soft cheeses
Cutting soft cheeses
As you may have already noticed, when you have to use a "soft" cheese in a recipe - their exact name is "soft cheese" - such as Camembert, Munster or Mont d'or, it's not easy to make anything other than thick slices.
7575 February 20th 2024
In praise of slow cooking
In praise of slow cooking
You will no doubt have noticed that in cookery, it's often the actual cooking process that gets neglected. This is understandable; it comes at the end of the recipe and getting the dish in the oven is something of a relief (ah, that's done!), which frees us to cope with what's left: tidying the...
36K4.2 February 9th 2011
The painter, the restaurant owners and the opera singer
The painter, the restaurant owners and the opera singer
You might well have noticed that there are recipes involving names that have been so overused (often for any old thing) that they have almost become common nouns.
17K4.4 September 25th 2012
Post your comment or question
Posted by:
I am not a leaving thing
Follow this page
If you are interested in this page, you can "follow" it, by entering your email address here. You will then receive a notification immediately each time the page is modified or a new comment is added. Please note that you will need to confirm this following.
I am not a leaving thing
Note: We'll never share your e-mail address with anyone else.
Alternatively: you can subscribe to the mailing list of cooling-ez.com , you will receive a e-mail for each new recipe published on the site.

Back to top of page