The blog of cooking-ez.com

Creams in pastry


Creams in pastry
In this post, I propose you to make a small tour of the different creams in pastry.

If you like to make them at home, you have already noticed the many creams that exist for the different desserts: Chantilly, custard, diplomat, Bavarian, etc. etc.

Each one more delicious than the other, they are the keystone of French pastry making, what makes a good part of its success in the world, the basics that any good pastry chef must absolutely master, and a challenge for the amateurs that we are.
8,709 4.5/5 based on 17 reviews
Grade this page:

Last modified on: March 12th 2022

Keywords for this post:PastryCreamsOverviewCustardTour
Creams in pastry

Let's look at the main creams in the range

I could have listed them one by one, indicating what is in them, but for many of them there is a link, such as for the cream B we start from cream A and add this or that.

All this creates a kind of hierarchy in the creams, and that's how I'm going to try to tell you about it.
crème anglaiseAt the beginning, the mother of all egg-based creams, if you can call it that, is the custard (crème anglaise in french) It's a simple recipe: milk, sugar, egg yolks and vanilla, cooked gently until smooth, that's all.

Example of use: Profiteroles.



Then there are the creams that contain custard, which are :

1) Bavarian cream = Custard + gelatin + whipped cream: In the hot custard, add gelatin, let it cool, then gently add whipped cream.

Example of use: Various cakes and desserts.

crème glacée2) Ice cream (or vanilla ice cream) = Custard + fresh cream: In the cold custard, fresh cream is added, then the mixture is blended in an ice cream maker.

Example of use: Various ice creams or ice cream.

crème pâtissière3) Pastry cream = Custard + cornstarch: Cook until boiling, you get a much thicker cream.

Example of use: To garnish éclairs.


Then the creams, based on custard :

crème mousseline

4) Crème mousseline = Pastry cream + butter: In the hot pastry cream, add butter and whip vigorously to aerate.

Example of use: A strawberry cake.

crème chiboust5) Chiboust cream = Pastry cream + meringue: In the cold pastry cream, we add raw meringue (French or Italian) and we incorporate delicately.

Example of use: A saint-honoré.

crème diplomate6) Diplomat cream = Custard + gelatine + whipped cream: Add gelatine to the hot custard, let it cool, then gently fold in whipped cream.

Example of use: Various cakes and entremets (the diplomat cream is so good that it's impossible to resist...).

crème frangipane7) Frangipane cream = Pastry cream + almond cream: In the almond cream, cold pastry cream is added.

Example of use: Filling of galette des rois with frangipane cream.



To complete the table, 2 other creams related to the previous ones:

crème chantilly8) Whipped cream = Crème fraiche + sugar: In the cold crème fraiche, we add sugar, we whip to make it rise.

Example of use: Cream puffs. Tip: replace half of the crème fraiche with mascarpone, even more delicious and more stable over time.


crème d'amandes9) Almond cream = Almond powder + butter + eggs + sugar + cornstarch + rum: We mix all the ingredients with a mixer to aerate the whole.

Example of use: Topping of galette des rois with almond cream.



There are still many others, but with these alone you already have a tasty panorama of what is possible in pastry.

Let's add to this that, in addition, you can vary the flavors, if at the beginning it is often vanilla flavor, each cream can be declined in delicious variations as chocolate, coffee, fruits, alcohols, herbs, the only limit is your imagination, which is still pleasant.

By the way, when I say that these creams are a challenge for a pastry chef, it's because they are not that easy to make, you have to be precise and very careful, you quickly over or under cook.
The custard, if it is the origin of everything, is thus quite delicate to succeed perfectly, especially at the beginning: not cooked enough it is vanilla milk, and too much it is full of lumps.

And to finish, here is a little diagram that summarizes the links between these creams:

panorama des crèmes en pâtisserie








Lasts posts
Clean your mixer easily
Clean your mixer easily
If you use a "bowl" or "blender" mixer, as opposed to a plunger, you've probably noticed that it's a bit of a hassle to clean it after use. And yet, with a simple trick, it can be done very quickly. See how here.
1,6935 June 26th 2024
Preserving egg yolks
Preserving egg yolks
If you're using only the egg whites in a recipe (such as meringues ), you'll need to store the yolks until you're ready to use them again. There's nothing very complicated about this in principle - all you have to do is chill them, but there are a few pitfalls to be avoided in practice.
2,2235 June 18th 2024
Preservative oil, an asset for taste
Preservative oil, an asset for taste
When you prepare a dish using an ingredient that has been preserved in fat, for example a springtime mixed salad with tuna in oil or sun-dried tomatoes, you're probably going to make a french dressing (vinaigrette) next. In that case, why not use the preserved oil from the tuna or tomatoes?
2,3555 June 5th 2024
Don't throw away disposable piping bags
Don't throw away disposable piping bags
Nowadays, it's fairly easy to find what professionals use as piping bags, i.e. disposable or "single-use" plastic ones. They're practical, functional and inexpensive, but disposable? That's debatable...
3,7555 May 28th 2024
Should asparagus really be cooked in bunches?
Should asparagus really be cooked in bunches?
You'll probably read recipes here and there explaining how to cook asparagus "en botte", i.e. in a small package (the famous "botte"). Is this really the right way to cook asparagus?
2,8865 May 22th 2024
Other pages you may also like
Butter doesn't make you fat, unless you eat too much of it.
Butter doesn't make you fat, unless you eat too much of it.
Whenever I'm discussing cooking and recipes, there is one idea which comes up frequently, like this: "Oh no! But that's got butter in it" (I should add, for the sake of accuracy, that this is something I hear more frequently from women, who are almost all concerned with keeping their figure). ...
38K4.5 March 26th 2012
Preserving egg yolks
Preserving egg yolks
If you're using only the egg whites in a recipe (such as meringues ), you'll need to store the yolks until you're ready to use them again. There's nothing very complicated about this in principle - all you have to do is chill them, but there are a few pitfalls to be avoided in practice.
2,2235 June 18th 2024
What can I use for blind baking a pastry case?
What can I use for blind baking a pastry case?
When it comes to home-made desserts, tarts are always popular. They can be divided into two basic types: those cooked with their filling, such as an apricot and almond cream tart, and those where the filling is added after baking the pastry case, such as a strawberry tart or chocolate tart. For...
105K4.5 May 2nd 2017
Egg yolks and caster sugar
Egg yolks and caster sugar
We often come across recipes where we need to mix egg yolks with caster sugar. This would appear to be a very ordinary and simple thing to do but, be warned, these two ingredients can behave oddly together.
73K 24.4 February 15th 2018
Is it really necessary to cream egg yolks?
Is it really necessary to cream egg yolks?
Let’s try and answer a question that crops up in cookery and patisserie, even if it verges on the existential: do the egg yolks in a custard recipe really need to be beaten until pale, or not?
37K4.3 February 28th 2018
Post a comment or question
Posted by:
I am not a leaving thing
Follow this page
If you are interested in this page, you can "follow" it, by entering your email address here. You will then receive a notification immediately each time the page is modified or a new comment is added. Please note that you will need to confirm this following.
I am not a leaving thing
Note: We'll never share your e-mail address with anyone else.
Alternatively: you can subscribe to the mailing list of cooling-ez.com , you will receive a e-mail for each new recipe published on the site.

Back to top of page