The blog of cooking-ez.com

How to properly roll out a pie crust?


How to properly roll out a pie crust?
Very often in pastry making, you have to roll out a pastry before using it for a pie or another dessert.
At home, of course, you get out your rolling pin and simply roll it out.

Is there a way to get an evenly rolled out dough? That's what we will see in this article.
3,993 16 4.9
Grade this page:

Last modified on: May 10th 2023

Keywords for this post:PastryDoughRollWedgesThicknessRegularThin
How to properly roll out a pie crust?

abaisse de 3 mm d'épaisseur


To make a good pie, you need to have a pastry (shortcrust, shortbread, sweet or other...) that is rolled out thinly, i.e. about 3 mm thick.
It must be rolled out thinly, but also regularly, in other words the thickness must be the same on the whole surface of the dough.

It's not that easy to roll out a dough evenly, and the professionals who do it often work with a rather extraordinary machine called a rolling mill: The dough is pushed by an automatic belt between 2 metal cylinders of adjustable thickness.

laminoir



At home, there is no secret, you have to work with a roller and therefore spread your dough a little by eye to determine the right thickness, and be as regular as possible.

Can we improve this?

Yes, and with a very simple and inexpensive tool, the pastry wedges.
As their name indicates, they are very simple blocks, in different materials, metal, silicone, wood... and of fixed thickness, often 3, 5 and 10 mm.



To use them, you just have to start rolling out as usual, then when you are close to the chosen thickness, put the wedges around the dough, and pass the rolling pin by leaning on the wedges.

abaisse de 3 mm d'épaisseur



This way, the roller can't go lower than the wedges, and your dough can't go lower in thickness than the wedges.
It's both very simple and very effective, so don't hesitate to try it.

To sum up: To roll out a dough evenly, nothing is more practical than pastry blocks of the chosen thickness.


Back to top of page

Lasts posts
Cutting soft cheeses
Cutting soft cheeses
As you may have already noticed, when you have to use a "soft" cheese in a recipe - their exact name is "soft cheese" - such as Camembert, Munster or Mont d'or, it's not easy to make anything other than thick slices.
5435 February 20th 2024
It's spinning too fast!
It's spinning too fast!
When you need to grate or slice vegetables, you generally use an electric machine that does all the work: a food processor, a mixer with a "slicer" extension or similar. Are these machines really suitable? Generally speaking, yes of course, but there's one criterion that often poses a problem,...
3,7355 November 12th 2023
When I was a kid, I didn't like...
When I was a kid, I didn't like...
Maybe you've already made this strange observation: when you were a kid, there were things you hated, but as an adult it's almost the opposite? For example, you used to hate spinach or chicory, but now you love it?
3,3885 November 5th 2023
How easy is it to chop herbs?
How easy is it to chop herbs?
Whenever you have fresh herbs - parsley, chervil, coriander, mint, etc. - to incorporate into a recipe, we tell you to chop them up. In this case, "chopping" means separating the leaves from the stems, keeping only the leaves, and chopping them more or less finely. It's not very complicated,...
5,3555 September 12th 2023
The softness of sandwich bread
The softness of sandwich bread
You're probably familiar with what's known in France as "pain de mie", a very white, molded and rather soft bread, widely used in cooking, particularly for croque-monsieur. Let's find out what it's all about.
5,799 September 5th 2023
Other pages you may also like
What is the difference between bakery and patisserie?
What is the difference between bakery and patisserie?
This is a question that you may well have asked yourself and which I will attempt to answer. In France the two trades of "boulangerie" (bakery) and "pâtisserie" (patisserie and confectionery) have always been quite distinct, but where exactly do the boundaries lie? .
117K 14.1 February 7th 2017
A few tips for effective kneading at home
A few tips for effective kneading at home
When you have to knead dough for bread or some other recipe, you may well use a food processor or the type of machine known as a stand mixer. The best-known brands are Kenwood and KitchenAid. They are useful tools, but here are a few tips to help you get the best out of them.
264K 23.7 June 23th 2021
Fruits which can ruin your jelly
Fruits which can ruin your jelly
There are many ways of making a fruit mousse, but one of the simplest is to prepare a fruit jelly (basically a fresh fruit coulis with gelatine) and then mix this jelly before it sets completely with whipped cream. The result is perfect for filling a charlotte, for example. But do beware;...
66K4.0 March 6th 2013
Raising (or leavening) agents
Raising (or leavening) agents
When we want to make a dough or batter rise when baking, either in patisserie or bread-making, we need to use a raising agent or leavening agent, one of which is called leaven. In the context of baking, a raising agent is simply what "makes something rise". It is a substance which, when added to...
50K4.8 June 16th 2021
The window-pane test in bread-making
The window-pane test in bread-making
The home bread-makers often ask themselves “Have I kneaded my dough long enough?” . A good question, as dough that is insufficiently kneaded will not rise properly or will fall flat when the top is slashed, which is very frustrating. To know when the dough is ready, one can rely on the length...
86K 23.9 June 16th 2021
Post your comment or question
Posted by:
I am not a leaving thing
Follow this page
If you are interested in this page, you can "follow" it, by entering your email address here. You will then receive a notification immediately each time the page is modified or a new comment is added. Please note that you will need to confirm this following.
I am not a leaving thing
Note: We'll never share your e-mail address with anyone else.
Alternatively: you can subscribe to the mailing list of cooling-ez.com , you will receive a e-mail for each new recipe published on the site.

Back to top of page