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How to sprinkle well?


How to sprinkle well?
When in a recipe you need to sprinkle something, that is to say to spread a fine layer of powder (flour, sugar, etc.) on something, powdered sugar on a pie for example, you will probably use a fine strainer or a sieve, this is the best way to proceed.

But is that all?
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Last modified on: May 23th 2023

Keywords for this post:TipsTricksStrainerPowderSprinkleSprinkling
How to sprinkle well?
At the beginning you will realize that it is not that easy, and that it is very easy to put a little bit everywhere badly distributed vs a thin regular layer.
Especially if you go fast enough (with a spoon for example), the best way to make small piles of powder badly distributed on the targeted surface.

The use of a sieve or a sprinkler, which I have already mentioned, is almost indispensable in practice, as it contains the powder to be spread evenly and allows it to be spread "in the rain", thus sprinkling.

But, in a very natural reflex you will probably do this:

saupoudrage

It works of course, but you will probably put it far beyond the targeted surface, for example far beyond your pie.

The practical trick is to block the colander with your hand when it reaches the limit of the right surface.

saupoudrage bloqué


So you take a little momentum to the right (green arrow), and you go to the left where your hand blocks the colander (red arrow) with a tiny shock against your hand, a shock that still helps the sprinkling.
Of course, if you are left-handed, you will reverse the direction.

It is a very simple and effective gesture, try it the next time you have to sprinkle.

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