The blog of cooking-ez.com

The skin of the almonds


The skin of the almonds
If you like almonds, in their dried fruit version, you must use them quite often in cooking or baking, whether powdered or whole.

It is not obvious, but in fact there is 2 kinds of almonds in the market, wholesale with or without the skin.
17K 15 4.7
Grade this page:

Last modified on: February 8th 2020

Keywords for this post:AlmondsDry fruitSkinWhiteGrey
The skin of the almonds
For whole almonds, there are 2 versions in stores: so-called "white" or "blanched" almonds, ie without their brown skin, and "whole" almonds with their skin.

amandes blanchesalmonds with skin



For the almond powder, there is the same powder known as "white almonds" where they are almonds without the skin which are reduced to powder, and the so-called "gray" almond powder where they are the almonds. whole which are crushed.

poudre amandes blanchespowder almonds gray



Is there a difference?

Yes, and it is important, first of all the taste: whole almonds, with their skin therefore, have more taste than white almonds, precisely because the skin participates in the taste. It's pretty easy to check, bite into one then the other, and you'll quickly feel the difference. So as a general rule, it is better to use whole almonds or gray powder, your cake or whatever you bake will be better for it.

Then there is a question of aesthetics: the white almond powder is purer, which means that it does not color the preparation in which it is incorporated, which can sometimes be something desired. The most common example is the marzipan, if you want to obtain a smooth paste and of uniform color, it is better to use white almond powder.

white almond paste



So you can see that casually, this skin of almonds which seems quite harmless has consequences on your future pastries, and (a little) on your wallet also, the powder of gray almonds and whole almonds are less expensive than the white ones.

Does this apply to all dried fruits?

No, it's often even the opposite, see for example hazelnuts and pistachios, for these 2 it's exactly the opposite, the skin does not add anything at all, it is even quite unpleasant to the taste, and it is strongly advised to withdraw it, or to buy "hulled" ones because for both it is rather painful to withdraw.

If you have to do it for hazelnuts for example, the best way is to roast them in the oven for 15 minutes at 320°F (160°C), then rub them out of the oven in a tea towel, the skin comes off in the form of a powder that you can dispose.

remove hazelnut skin




In summary: For almonds always prefer the version with the skin, much better, unless you need aesthetic purity (marzipan, macaroons), and for other dried fruits, hazelnuts in in particular, it is the opposite, prefer the version without the skin.

Back to top of page

Lasts posts
Cutting soft cheeses
Cutting soft cheeses
As you may have already noticed, when you have to use a "soft" cheese in a recipe - their exact name is "soft cheese" - such as Camembert, Munster or Mont d'or, it's not easy to make anything other than thick slices.
5195 February 20th 2024
It's spinning too fast!
It's spinning too fast!
When you need to grate or slice vegetables, you generally use an electric machine that does all the work: a food processor, a mixer with a "slicer" extension or similar. Are these machines really suitable? Generally speaking, yes of course, but there's one criterion that often poses a problem,...
3,7265 November 12th 2023
When I was a kid, I didn't like...
When I was a kid, I didn't like...
Maybe you've already made this strange observation: when you were a kid, there were things you hated, but as an adult it's almost the opposite? For example, you used to hate spinach or chicory, but now you love it?
3,3805 November 5th 2023
How easy is it to chop herbs?
How easy is it to chop herbs?
Whenever you have fresh herbs - parsley, chervil, coriander, mint, etc. - to incorporate into a recipe, we tell you to chop them up. In this case, "chopping" means separating the leaves from the stems, keeping only the leaves, and chopping them more or less finely. It's not very complicated,...
5,3485 September 12th 2023
The softness of sandwich bread
The softness of sandwich bread
You're probably familiar with what's known in France as "pain de mie", a very white, molded and rather soft bread, widely used in cooking, particularly for croque-monsieur. Let's find out what it's all about.
5,786 September 5th 2023
Other pages you may also like
A few tips for effective kneading at home
A few tips for effective kneading at home
When you have to knead dough for bread or some other recipe, you may well use a food processor or the type of machine known as a stand mixer. The best-known brands are Kenwood and KitchenAid. They are useful tools, but here are a few tips to help you get the best out of them.
264K 23.7 June 23th 2021
Fruits which can ruin your jelly
Fruits which can ruin your jelly
There are many ways of making a fruit mousse, but one of the simplest is to prepare a fruit jelly (basically a fresh fruit coulis with gelatine) and then mix this jelly before it sets completely with whipped cream. The result is perfect for filling a charlotte, for example. But do beware;...
66K4.0 March 6th 2013
The right weight of pastry for a pie
The right weight of pastry for a pie
Let's try to solve a thorny problem: How much dough will I need when I make my next pie? You're planning to make a pie, you're going to use your favourite mould or circle, but how much pastry will you need to fill it completely with a well spread pastry, without being too thin, or on the contrary...
57K4.3 March 20th 2020
 The super powers of cornstarch
The super powers of cornstarch
I start this new year by evoking an old product, that you most probably have in your cupboards, a white powder, often in a small cardboard package with a slightly outdated look, only the "gluten free" is relatively recent, it is simply cornstarch, hence its name of maïzena. It's used for a lot...
7,912 January 14th 2022
The power of sayings and beliefs in the kitchen
The power of sayings and beliefs in the kitchen
One day, in the comments on the recipe for beaten egg whites, a young woman asked if you could beat egg whites stiff while having a period, as a friend had told her it wasn't possible. Sometime later another person commented that for mayonnaise it had been (get this!) scientifically proven that a...
46K4.4 February 6th 2011
Follow this page
If you are interested in this page, you can "follow" it, by entering your email address here. You will then receive a notification immediately each time the page is modified or a new comment is added. Please note that you will need to confirm this following.
I am not a leaving thing
Note: We'll never share your e-mail address with anyone else.
Alternatively: you can subscribe to the mailing list of cooling-ez.com , you will receive a e-mail for each new recipe published on the site.

Back to top of page