Products and ingredients: Cream


cream

Cream

If you leave milk to stand (real milk that is, full-fat, coming straight from the cow), after a while small droplets of fat float to the top, they come together and create the fat part of the milk: cream.

This cream, naturally liquid but which thickens over time, is drawn off the milk and sold as cream. From this basic cream, other kinds are developed:

  • Pouring cream, ("fleurette" in French): this is the classic cream from the top of the milk.
  • Crème fraiche: a cream which has undergone a brief lactic fermentation, which makes it thicker and slightly sour.
To these two kinds can be added UHT cream, which has been sterilised at high temperature.
If you intend to buy: Crème fraiche (sold in pots) and fresh liquid cream (sold in small bottles or cartons) should be stored in the fridge, for a limited time.

If they are UHT, these creams (sold in cartons) can be stored out of the fridge until they are opened, .

"Full" cream means without any fat removed, so it's real cream. Beware of all the "light", "reduced fat" or other creams of this type. In order to produce them, manufacturers need to replace the fat they remove with something else to keep the creamy texture, and this other additive is not necessarily good for your health.

If you want to use it: Crème fraiche is the cream of choise for sauces, but this is not an obligation. Fresh pouring cream is perfect for everything like whipped cream or chantilly.

You will surely notice that UHT creams have less flavour than fresh ones, because the sterilisation leaves them bland.

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Last modified on: July 12th 2021

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    Posted by Anonymous september 30th 2021 at 05:01 (n° 17)
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    Posted by jh august 19th 2021 at 09:50 (n° 16)
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    Posted by Hoping january 16th 2021 at 05:37 (n° 14)
  • No
    Posted by jh december 2nd 2020 at 23:01 (n° 13)
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    Posted by jh january 29th 2018 at 11:42 (n° 9)
  • What make is the popato and where can I buy it
    Posted by Jim january 28th 2018 at 21:36 (n° 8)
  • Hi,

    By "mash powder" do you mean mash potato powder?
    If so, yes you can, see how to on this chicken recipe : chicken breasts in a potato crust.
    Posted by jh january 29th 2015 at 17:35 (n° 7)
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    Posted by Emma january 29th 2015 at 13:46 (n° 6)
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    Posted by Anonymous january 22th 2015 at 12:44 (n° 5)
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    Posted by jh august 12th 2013 at 09:40 (n° 4)
  • What are the ingredients of a jar of griottines? are there any chemicals, additives, flavourings,aromas?
    Posted by trebor august 11th 2013 at 20:48 (n° 3)
  • Rind of what?
    Posted by jh january 16th 2012 at 08:40 (n° 2)
  • Is the rind edible once cooked, specifically oven baked?
    Posted by Juls january 14th 2012 at 22:41 (n° 1)

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