Cooking-ez.com

1,016 easy and fully explained recipes, with 12,353 photos and 77 videos

Quince paste


Quince paste
This traditional French "pâte de fruit" (fruit paste or leather) has a distinctive, firm consistency and is full of flavour, with the characteristic tang of quince.

The preparation is rather long, but the result is well worth all the effort.
8,8073/5 for 2 ratings
Grade this recipe:

Last modified on: December 3rd 2017

For 900 g, you will need:

How long does it take?

Time required
PreparationRestingCookingStart to finish
33 min.1 hour30 min.2 hours 3 min.
Keeping:
Several days (weeks, even) in the fridge, covered with plastic film.
At what time?
  • When will I finish if I start the recipe at a certain time?
    When should I start for the recipe to be ready at a certain time?
Work this out...

Step by step recipe


Stage 1 - 3 min.
Quince paste : Photo of step #1
Wash and brush 800 g quinces, but do not peel, as the skin add to the flavour.

Stage 2 - 8 min.
Quince paste : Photo of step #2
Cut the quinces into quarters, then remove and discard the core. Cut each quarter into small pieces.

Put the quince pieces into a saucepan, add ½ lemon cut into 4 and just enough water to cover.

Note: From 800g of quinces, you should be left with 500 g of cut fruit.

Stage 3 - 20 min.
Quince paste : Photo of step #3
Put the pan uncovered on medium heat and cook until the fruit is soft enough for the point of a knife to go through it easily.

Stage 4 - 5 min.
Quince paste : Photo of step #4
After cooking, discard the lemon pieces and pass the quinces through a vegetable mill on "fine" setting.

Do not throw away the cooking liquid.

Stage 5 - 3 min.
Quince paste : Photo of step #5
Transfer the quince pulp into a saucepan and weigh it (from 500 g cut fruit, you should be left with about 350 g of cooked pulp).

Weigh 30% of this weight in cooking liquid (100 g here), then mix this with the quince pulp.

You can add the zest of 1 orange at this point.

Stage 6 - 3 min.
Quince paste : Photo of step #6
Weigh 450 g granulated sugar (this should be the same wieght as the mixture of fruit pulp and cooking liquid).

Take out 50 g of this sugar at mix it separately with the 30 g jam sugar.

Stage 7 - 4 min.
Quince paste : Photo of step #7
Put the saucepan on high heat and bring to the boil, then tip in the 50 g of sugar with its gelling agent.

Stage 8 - 3 min.
Quince paste : Photo of step #8
Mix well, bring back to the boil and cook for 3 minutes, stirring constantly.

Stage 9 - 1 min.
Quince paste : Photo of step #9
Add the rest of the sugar all at once.

Stage 10 - 3 min.
Quince paste : Photo of step #10
Mix well, bring back to the boil and cook for a further 3 minutes, stirring constantly.

Stage 11 - 1 hour
Quince paste : Photo of step #11
Pour into a mould or tin, lined with a sheet of cooking parchment.

Leave to cool for at least 1 hour.

Stage 12 - 10 min.
Quince paste : Photo of step #12
Turn out and cut into pieces about the size of a sugar cube.

Stage 13
Quince paste : Photo of step #13
You can make the paste look more attractive by rolling the pieces in a little granulated sugar, but this is not essential.

Remarks

This is a very ancient sweetmeat, particularly appreciated at the French court during the Renaissance. It was apparently a favourite of both Marie de' Medici and the Duc de Guise.

Nutritional information

% are calculated relative to a Recommended Dietary Intake or RDI of 2000 k-calories or 8400 k-joules by day for a woman (change to a man).

How much will it cost?

Note : These prices are only approximate

Change currency:

Source

From gaston Lenôtre, but dedicated to Isabelle and Patrick who will recognise something of themselves here..

More recipes?

This recipe uses (among others)
QuinceQuince: You can check-out other recipes which use it, like for example: Quince and apple compote, ... All
Granulated sugarGranulated sugar: You can check-out other recipes which use it, like for example: Diamond biscuits, Windfall apple jelly, Galette Charentaise, Kouign-amann brioche, Candied grapefruit peel, ... All
Jam sugarJam sugar: You can check-out other recipes which use it, like for example: Clementine sorbet, Macarons (the original French macaroons) , Fillings for macaroons, ... All
LemonLemon: You can get more informations, or check-out other recipes which use it, for example: Santiago Cake, Artichoke hearts forestier , Eggs "en cocotte" with spinach, Mushroom buckwheat pancakes, Salmon rillettes, ... All

News list of cooking-ez.com

Sign up to receive the latest recipes (next batch due to be sent on 2019-07-21)

I am not a leaving thing
Note: We'll never share your email with anyone else.

Post your comment or question

You are welcome, if you wish, to comment on this recipe: why you like it or not, what you have changed, what results it gave, point out a mistake or omission, etc. You can also ask a question. I answer all questions (in a broken English, sorry) unless someone else does it before me.
Please feel free to say what you think, I'm always very interested in your opinion. Your comment will appear on line with the recipe, so please write in standard readable English, not SIM or only in CAPITALS, otherwise your comment may be rejected.

Please look at advice for submitting a comment or image (what you should or should not do). By the way, don't type your e-mail address in the comment, otherwise you might be spammed.

I am not a leaving thing

Follow this recipe

If you are interested in this recipe, you can "follow" it, by entering your email address here. You will then receive a notification immediately each time the recipe is modified or a new comment is added. Please note that you will need to confirm this following.
I am not a leaving thing
Note: We'll never share your email with anyone else.
Alternatively: you can subscribe to the mailing list of cooling-ez.com , you will receive a e-mail for each new recipe published on the site.

Back to top of page