Pogne de Romans

Step by step recipe:

  1. 8 min.Pogne de Romans : Photo of step #1
    Put into a mixer bowl: 500 g flour, 35 g orange flower water, 20 g rum, the juice and zest of 1 orange, 12 g salt, 1 g yeast, 225 g leaven, 125 g butter and the zest of 1 lemon.
  2. 30 min.Pogne de Romans : Photo of step #2
    Knead on slow speed for 30 minutes.
  3. Pogne de Romans : Photo of step #3
    This should give you a firm dough that French bakers call "bâtarde" (bastard).
  4. 1 min.Pogne de Romans : Photo of step #4
    Add 150 g caster sugar.
  5. 5 min.Pogne de Romans : Photo of step #5
    Knead for a further 5 minutes until the sugar is mixed in and the dough nice and smooth.
  6. 4 hoursPogne de Romans : Photo of step #6
    Gather the dough into a ball. Transfer this to a large clean bowl and cover with a plastic sheet.

    Leave to rest at room temperature for 4 hours.
  7. 5 min.Pogne de Romans : Photo of step #7
    After this time, weigh out the dough into lumps of 850 g for a ring pogne, or smaller for individual brioche style.
  8. 3 min.Pogne de Romans : Photo of step #8
    Press the 850 g of dough into a round, flat cake.

    Male a large hole in the centre and lay the ring on a baking sheet.
  9. 3 min.Pogne de Romans : Photo of step #9
    For the smaller brioche-style pogne, put the dough into a brioche tin or mould.
  10. 1 day 12 hoursPogne de Romans : Photo of step #10
    Cover with a plastic sheet and leave to rest at room temperature for 12 hours, then a further 24 hours in the fridge.
  11. 2 min.Pogne de Romans : Photo of step #11
    Preheat the oven to 360°F (180°C).

    Glaze the top of the pogne.
  12. 1 min.Pogne de Romans : Photo of step #12
    Slash the surface of the pogne in a large square, whether on the ring...
  13. Pogne de Romans : Photo of step #13
    ...or classic brioche shape.
  14. 40 min.Pogne de Romans : Photo of step #14
    Bake for about 40 minutes.
  15. Pogne de Romans : Photo of step #15
    Leave to cool on a wire rack.

Remarks:

Do not be surprised if all the kneading and resting times in this recipe seem excessive. This is because there is hardly any yeast, and the long resting time also develops the flavour we are aiming for.

Source:

Based on a recipe by Thomas Marie.

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