French onion soup

Step by step recipe:

  1. 20 min.French onion soup : Photo of step #1
    Prepare 700 g onion and chop finely.
  2. 3 min.French onion soup : Photo of step #2
    In a large saucepan or casserole, melt 50 g butter until it froths.
  3. 1 min.French onion soup : Photo of step #3
    When the butter is frothing well, add the chopped onions, salt and pepper. Mix well.
  4. 10 min.French onion soup : Photo of step #4
    Fry the onions on fairly high heat until lightly browned, stirring frequently to stop them burning.
  5. 2 min.French onion soup : Photo of step #5
    Sieve 50 g flour into the pan.
  6. 5 min.French onion soup : Photo of step #6
    Mix in and cook until starting to brown, stirring constantly.
  7. 1 min.French onion soup : Photo of step #7
    Pour in 200 ml dry white wine all at once.
  8. 3 min.French onion soup : Photo of step #8
    Stir until well mixed.

    Leave to cook for 2 or 3 minutes while stirring.
  9. 1 min.French onion soup : Photo of step #9
    Pour in the chicken stock, made by mixing 2 litres water (hot) with 2 chicken stock cubes.

    Bring to the boil.
  10. 1 hour 30 min.French onion soup : Photo of step #10
    When boiling, turn the heat down to its lowest, cover and leave to cook for 1½ to 2 hours.
  11. 5 min.French onion soup : Photo of step #11
    Meanwhile, butter 4 slices bread and top with grated cheese.

    Press the cheese down gently to help it stick to the buttered bread.
  12. 4 min.French onion soup : Photo of step #12
    Cut the bread into small squares and arrange these on a baking sheet. Brown under the grill (keep an eye on the colour).
  13. 1 min.French onion soup : Photo of step #13
    When the onion soup is cooked, check the seasoning.
  14. 3 min.French onion soup : Photo of step #14
    Serve piping hot in large bowls, topped with with the cheese croutons.

Remarks:

Use either white or yellow onions, but preferably not red ones, as they are less suitable for the long slow cooking.

At Step 4 of the recipe, there are 2 conflicting schools of thought: some prefer the more traditional method of cooking the onions until they are dark brown, others (like me) only brown them lightly - it's a matter of taste, of course. I remember as a child staying with my grandmother Jeanne. She used to cook her onions until they were really dark and, back then, I loved that.

For the grated cheese, choose whatever you prefer that browns well, such as Comté, Gruyère or even Emmental.

Source:

Based on a recipe by Gaston Lenôtre.

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